Sophomores to stay on Mount Carmel

By on April 9, 2014

While Quinnipiac saw some housing changes this academic year, including sophomores living on the York Hill campus, Residential Life Director Jennifer Crane says not much will change in the upcoming fall semester.

housingmeganMegan Maher

Residential Life projects sophomores will not live on York Hill next academic year, Crane said. Transfers, juniors and seniors will be housed on York Hill and surrounding university properties, she said.

Current sophomores can also pick university houses on New Road for next semester.

 “These are available on a limited basis,” Crane said. “With the sense of independence coupled with the luxury of Quinnipiac services, these houses will go fast.”

The number of students who will live on campus as juniors next year increased, Crane said.

“We are happy to report that more current sophomores paid a deposit for next fall than in the recent past,” she said.

This year’s freshman class was the largest freshman class ever at Quinnipiac and one of the reasons why housing changes were made for this fall. As a result, sophomores were moved to the suite-style residence halls and freshmen were assigned in Mountainview. About 25 sophomores and all transfer students lived on York Hill, a campus traditionally meant for juniors and seniors.

Sophomore Jeffrey Sarin said the university made the right choice to keep sophomores on the Mount Carmel campus next semester.

“I don’t think sophomores should be up there [on York Hill],” Sarin said. “I know that transfer students have to live up there, so that’s not fair also, but I think the group should stay together, freshmen stay together, sophomores stay together.”

Crane said the growing number of students on campus is a good thing.

“We have spaces on York Hill to accommodate larger class sizes as they persist through their time at Quinnipiac,” she said. “We will be able to accommodate everyone who has paid a [housing] deposit.”

 

Freshman Danielle Salmon said the housing process is “terrible” because she has not found roommates yet.

“For people like me, I don’t have a room,” she said. “So I’m just trying to find anyone that has an open spot, so it’s hard.”

One new feature of the housing process is the online roommate selection, where students can search for additional roommates.

“Previously, students could put their information in a book in Residential Life and could also preview the information other students wrote in,” Crane said. “This year, you will be able to locate individuals online. We will continue to have the book in Residential Life for students looking for a group or who are interested in being picked up by a group.”

Crane said she suggests students make “a plan and a backup plan” before selecting housing.

“Although we would like for everyone to get their first choice, it is impossible for everyone to get their first choice,” she said. “Being prepared with a second and third plan will help ease transition if you have to pick something other than your first choice.”

It is also important for students to select housing during their designated time, she said.

“That time is designated just for you,” Crane said. “If you do not pick at that time, you will still be able to pick your housing but other students will be able to pick at that time as well.”

It is not too late for students to pay their housing deposit if they want to live on campus, she said.

“Often students will study abroad or decide to not return to housing for some reason,” Crane said. “This will create spaces for students who are waiting to get on campus. We want to accommodate everyone who wants to live on campus.”

Current sophomores selected housing Monday and current freshmen will go through the housing process next week.

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