‘It’s your ticket;’ do with it what you want

By on February 20, 2013

At 10 p.m. Monday evening, most of the Quinnipiac student body attempted to secure free tickets to the most anticipated home game on the athletic calendar, the Quinnipiac/Yale ice hockey game on Saturday. Only 1,000 tickets were given out, but a lucky group of 100 students were given a ticket for attending the most basketball or hockey games at the TD Bank Sports Center in the 2012-13 season.

Predictably, the controversial topic blew up on social media following the giveaway. Many were thrilled to be attending the contest. Others expressed that anyone who had a ticket and didn’t plan to go, should give it away as they did not pay for it. A few immediately raced to groups and class pages in order to alert their friends that their ticket was for sale.

Newsflash, people. It’s okay to sell your ticket. It is YOUR ticket. Therefore, you’re entitled to do whatever you want with it. If you clicked the button at 10 p.m. exactly, set yourself up with the best internet connection, and didn’t refresh the page a million times, then props to you. The same goes if you were in the lucky group of 100. You earned that ticket, and therefore, it is yours to do with as you please.

Many claimed that their computers weren’t fast enough and the website crashed on them when attempting to claim a ticket. There are numerous locations around the Mount Carmel campus where computers are connected via Ethernet cords, giving you the best possible Internet connection. One notable spot is the library, which is open 24 hours a day.

There are also a decent amount of students on campus who do not have a lot of personal spending money. For some of us, like myself, our parents don’t give us every dollar we ask for. They force us to learn the value of money and leave it up to us on how we wish to spend money we have earned. If we, as students, wish to sell a ticket we earned for pocket money, that is our choice.

Last year, I didn’t get a free ticket. So, I bought one off a friend for $30. I didn’t complain.

It’s your ticket, do as you please with it. If you would like to give it away to a friend, then that’s okay. But if you want to sell your “golden ticket” for $30? Be my guest.

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About Bryan Lipiner

Former Editor-in-Chief of 2014-2015
Twitter: @Bryan_Lipiner
Year: 2015
Major: Print journalism