Film Critique: The King’s Speech

By on February 2, 2011

“Blew Me Away”

“The King’s Speech” is a prime example of taking a true story and transforming it into a great film. It is very interesting to see into the life of King George VI. The king is usually viewed as confident and powerful, ready to take on his duties. However, the film explores the insecurities and struggles of the king, urging the viewers to sympathize. Although unusual, the unique portrayal of the king is what makes this film so intriguing.

The acting in “The King’s Speech” blew me away. Although Geoffrey Rush, Helena Bonham Carter and many others put on great performances, Colin Firth’s performance is absolutely flawless. The way Firth expresses King George’s speech problems and anger issues is textbook. The constant stammering and frustrated facial expressions are very realistic. One of my favorite scenes from the film is when the king becomes extremely frustrated during a lesson with his speech therapist and begins endlessly swearing. The anger portrayed is perfect. Firth’s outstanding performance in “The King’s Speech” earned him an Oscar nomination, and I will be shocked if he does not win.

The cinematography in this film is outstanding, making it that much more enjoyable. My favorite shot in the film is when King George VI is getting ready to talk into the microphone and give his speech. The camera is set close to Firth’s face, expressing a sense of claustrophobia. It really gives the viewer a sense of how much pressure was on King George VI at that moment in time. During the scene, I even began to feel nervous myself.

The touching story of King George VI had me leaving the movie theater very pleased. With the outstanding acting, effective cinematography and incredible history behind the film, “The King’s Speech” is a great success. Recently nominated for Best Picture of the year, I believe “The King’s Speech” has a very good chance of winning.

“Truly Beautiful Story”

Tom Hooper directs an ace of a film driven at the helm by Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush. Both men appeared to flawlessly represent the friendship between King George VI and his speech therapist, Lionel Logue.

All I can really say is I was taken away by specific scenes involving King George’s internal struggle with self-confidence and his external struggles about actually being a king. I praise many scenes from the movie, but the one when Firth is dressed as the king coming back from an unsuccessful speech is really memorable to me. He comes back to his family disappointed and concerned for his future. As he appears in front of his two daughters he stands internally upset about his stammer and the well-being of his family. Then, one of the two daughters calls him “Your Majesty,” in awe of her father’s ornate uniform. The unbelievable pressure of what King George went through is seen and quite evident. Firth plays the troubled heir-to-the-throne to a tee. The emotions on his face illustrated the situations at hand easily and without overacting. When Firth and Rush are on screen together, their presence is at times overwhelming. This is also a great turn for Helena Bonham Carter, who did a fantastic job, too, as King George’s wife and friend.

The story itself is very interesting and was portrayed well onscreen. “The King’s Speech” is a story of inspiration and the unbelievable journey of a man’s progression to find himself among his obstacles and flaws. Altogether, “The King’s Speech” is a truly beautiful story of human emotion and triumph. The Oscar race is definitely a crowded one this year. Many great films have appeared in 2010 and are notable contenders for the most prized awards in Hollywood. No matter what the critics say, this film is my personal favorite of 2010.

12 Oscar nominations

Actor in a Leading Role – Colin Firth

Actor in a Supporting Role – Geoffrey Rush

Actress in a Supporting Role – Helena Bonham Carter

Art Direction

Best Picture

Cinematography

Costume Design

Directing

Film Editing

Original Score

Sound Mixing

Original Screenplay

Directed by: Tom Hooper

Starring: Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter, Geoffrey Rush

Overview:

“The King’s Speech” is the remarkable story of King George VI’s struggle of becoming an icon of hope and reassurance through the darkest moments of World War II. The king seeks the help of a speech therapist to rid himself of a horrific stammer in order to overcome his insecurities about being a worthy king. Along the way, a great friendship is formed between the king (Colin Firth) and his speech therapist, Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush).

Media credit: youtube.com

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