7 ways to stick a job interview

By on April 7, 2010

With summer approaching and internships and jobs hiring, many interviews are taking place right now between students and employers. The competition is steep. Some are seasoned pros in the art of sitting down and answering questions, while others are just becoming familiar with being interviewed. Wherever you are in the process, it is always good to be prepared with a few tips on hand to make yourself stand out in a sea of job searching hopefuls.

1. Do your research. Whatever company you are interviewing with, make sure you have researched them. Know the manager or boss’s name, know any recent productions or events the company has been involved with and know what exactly the job you are applying for is requiring. If you seem interested in the company and its current events, chances are they will be interested in you.

2. Have your resume tweaked. Even if the place you are interviewing at has your resume, touch it up right before. Have an extra set of eyes look over it to double check for cohesiveness and proper grammar. The deans of career services in the schools at QU are more than happy to look over your resume.

3. Dress to Impress. Interview attire should be as professional as possible. Suits for both males and females are a good option. Even if you are applying for a fashion magazine, experts say it is best not to be too trendy. You want your first impression to be taken seriously- your interviewer should be focusing more on you than your outfit.

4. Practice. It may sound silly, but practicing your interviewing skills out loud will help you during the meeting. Be prepared to talk about yourself and your accomplishments. Make sure you are pronouncing your words correctly. Anticipate the questions you will be asked.

5. Practice good interview etiquette. There are common dos and don’ts of interviewing that people sometimes forget the morning of their big day. Eat breakfast that morning- food in your system will calm your nerves and keep you more focused. Make sure you arrive early or right on time. If you don’t know where the location is, leave extra early. Don’t chew gum. Relax! Make sure you properly pronounce your interviewers name, stand up when he or she walks in and give them a firm handshake.

6. Ask Questions. A future employer will almost always ask their interviewee if they have any questions. Answering no looks like you are a know-it-all or don’t really care about the position. Don’t be afraid to ask the questions you are really thinking. You will come off as looking more interested.

7. Follow up with a Thank you note. It’s easy to send a quick E-mail to the person you met with. A hand written thank you note is memorable and shows you took the time out of your day to do it. Thank your interviewer for their time meeting with you and express your interest in hearing from them shortly.

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About Mary-Catherine Dolan