That New York Style

By on March 25, 2009

Against an industrious backdrop of skyscrapers, pavement, flashing neon lights and yellow taxis whizzing past the streets, New York City offers an atomsphere that is much less gritty than the dirty-water hot dogs sold on every corner. Only a MetroNorth train ride away Quinnipiac students, New York City is the fashion focal point for budding designers, models and dedicated shoppers.

The streets of Manhattan, from SoHo to Uptown, have become free fashion shows for all who are interested in the chic choices tourists and inhabitants of one of the greatest cities in the world make in their wardrobes on a daily basis.

New York’s cliché description of “urban chic” has remained throughout the years. The men and women who ride the subways and walk through the parks in their best outfits offer a breath of fresh air to the city’s historic quality.

In New York’s SoHo, or the “South of Houston” district, is lower Manhattan’s district where abstract artists, acclaimed actors and retired musicians have settled. It is an area where bohemian hippie chic clashes with high-end couture. Fringed moccasin boots, leather bomber jackets, floral scarves, flowing blouses, patterned tights, long, Greek-esque summer dresses and the occasional beat-up Converse sneaker have made their way through the cobblestone streets.

SoHo is also well-known for its hard-to-find shops and restaurants, and now more than ever, it is known for its eclectic personalities walking down Prince Street in their latest ensemble. Everyday dwellers are often bold, sporting items such as fur coats, bright makeup and crazy-colored skinny pants, but in this neighborhood, anything goes. SoHo’s selection of unique vintage and thrift stores allow shoppers more leeway during their fashion trips, offering pieces that no one else is sure to have.

In New York’s Upper East Side, where the city’s old money and business heirs reside, fashion is more classic and reserved. Nonetheless, on the Streets of Lexington and Park Avenue, clothing choices are still in high demand. As if you were watching a scene from Gossip Girl, the taste of fashion you receive is indeed “rich.” Emerging from pricey hotels or five-star eating joints, stylish new Yorkers walk around in clean-cut trench coats in block colors and tweed prints, tall leather riding boots in different shades of browns, tans, and reds, classic flared denim jeans, knee-length bubble skirts, fitted blazers, and empire-waist cocktail dresses. The trend that was most noted was the “black suit,” with women wearing head-to-toe black, with sleek pants or skirts, tight turtle-necks, and thin kitten heels.

Freshman Katie Bliss has a similar outlook on the New York City’s fashion scene.

“I think people look pretty classy,” she said. “But, there are always people with cool urban-style outfits.”

New York City is as fast-paced as it can get, with its people and locations constantly bustling and never stopping. Subway stations and rides can reveal the heart of the city and those who live in it, with its workers and commuters traveling everyday in the underground tunnels. On the subway, you will find New York’s variety of people, from the grungy musician in his tight denim and flannel shirt to the Time Square tourist bundled up in knit tights, killer suede boots, and a crocheted scarf.

New York is the place to find variety in where you choose to shop and what you choose to wear. Large department stores such as Macy’s in Herald Square or a thrift store downtown such as Buffalo Exchange give New York reason for being the highlight of Fashion Week, where fashion can be praised whether it was found in the trash or in the most expensive boutique. Shopping in New York City is indeed coveted. “It’s expensive but I love it!” said freshman Michelle Wolff.

In New York, anything that can be worn will be worn.


About Sarah Rosenberg

Associate Arts & Life Editor
Twitter: @rosen_tosen
Year: 2012
Major: English
Hometown: Stewart Manor, N.Y.
Dream Job: Music Supervisor for films and/or television shows