Plan the best class schedule

By on November 7, 2007

If you’ve checked your mail anytime in the last two weeks, you’ve probably received that all-important, life changing white package.

You have probably also experienced the disappointment that comes after opening said package and discovering you have gotten that last day to register. But regardless of whether you’ve gotten the best or worst time slot, there are several factors to keep in mind when scheduling classes.

One of the most important things to remember when planning classes is the timing. Can you sit in a classroom for hours at a time? Are you a morning person or a night person?

“I’m not a morning person,” said Andrew Fletcher, a sophomore print journalism major. “This semester none of my classes started until at least 11 a.m., but next semester a lot of my classes only have one or two sections, most of which are early in the morning.”

Another factor to consider is whether or not any of the classes only meet once a week. It’s best to schedule labs and once-a-week classes first because they meet for three hours. It is easiest to plan these classes first and then schedule the other classes around it to ease troubles.

It is also always a good idea to do a little research on different professors. Web sites like and are great resources that have reviews about most professors from students who have taken them.

“Obviously times are really important when I’m scheduling my classes, but I also look at QUreview too,” said Emily Dziobek, a sophomore media production major. “At the very least it gives me a heads up for what to expect.”

It is also important not to overload schedules. On paper it might sound like a good idea to have classes back to back from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. However, schedules like this can get old fast. Students should try to schedule in breaks between classes. It is helpful to get work done or nap during a two or three hour block between classes.

It’s important to have back-up choices for what you want to take and to remember that most classes are offered in both the spring and fall semesters.

Remember there is always next semester. However, if it’s a class that you absolutely have to take that semester, try talking to the department head.

“Don’t get discouraged if you have the last day to register or get closed out of classes,” Sophomore English major Bianca Ursillo said . “Last year I got so upset when I couldn’t get into classes, but you just need to relax and make sure you have plenty of back-ups.”

The most important factor is to not over-react. If you don’t get the schedule you want, remind yourself it is not the end of the world. You may have to get up earlier than you wanted, but by senior year you can plan the schedule you really want. So just relax and take it one class at a time.


About Holly Hitchen