Schweitzer Institute opens ‘Images of Peace’ exhibit

By on October 3, 2007

This past week marked a time in which the students and faculty of Quinnipiac University engaged in activities that brought awareness about the severity of nuclear and atomic warfare. Among them was The Albert Schweitzer Institute’s art exhibit titled “Images of Peace.”

“Images of Peace” opened on Sunday, Sept. 23 and hosted about 70 students and faculty members. The opening for the exhibit marked the 50th anniversary of Albert Schweitzer’s call for nuclear disarmament and was made possible through the work of Professor Stephen Henderson, his wife Dianna, Professor Lenny Moscowitz and professor Tong Hoang. Henderson was responsible for communicating with all of the artists through e-mail and art periodicals asking them to have their work shown at the exhibit. There are a total of 22 pieces in the exhibit and the artists come from all over the country.

“It was quite a bit of work,” said Henderson as he reflected on the art work around the room of the Schweitzer Institute, “But the show is good itself.”

Each work of art is mounted on the wall and beside each work there is a framed statement from the artist explaining their work and how it reflects peace and disarmament.

“Some of the works just hit you in the face,” Henderson said. “Their message is so strong and it just says so much.” One piece of artwork was done by a Quinnipiac student, Claire Currie, whose work depicts an older man and is entitled, “A Full Life.”

Another strong piece was a painting done by Patricia Brintle of Whitestone, N.Y., and is entitled “A Delicate Balance.” The piece was bought by the Schweitzer Institute and will remain permanently on its wall.

“Images of Peace” will run until Oct. 14. The exhibit is opened for viewing weekdays from 9 a.m.-noon and from 1-4 p.m. On Oct. 14 the exhibit will be opened from 1-4 p.m. as well. Among the other lectures and activities that marked Atomic Week on Quinnipiac’s campus, “Images of Peace” presents an artistic view of the importance of nuclear disarmament and peace.


About Carole Ann Kinnaw