Quinnipiac needs diversity education to erase hate

By on October 31, 2007

It has become clear to me that there is a problem with the student body which has been given the cold shoulder by a majority of the campus population, including our administration. Not once but four times, a derogatory term was written on the doors of four African American students. Yes, the n-word was not just thrown around, but meticulously written on the white board of unsuspecting victims. Each time, the act was done in a freshman dorm. And each time, it hurt.

As a freshman, I was stunned to find that in an environment where we have all been given such an amazing opportunity to expand our points of view, ignorance prevailed. It is a disappointment, at the very least, to know that we have desensitized ourselves from the true meaning of the n-word. It is also a disappointment that it took three more acts of hate in order for the administration to file a police report, and take more action than mere discussion. Once should have been enough.

The word which no one dares to speak aloud can be described as nothing more than an act of hate. It is an act which not only displays the narrow minded and culturally deprived viewpoints of individuals, but creates an environment of fear. The action of writing on someone’s door does not necessarily scream racism, (although this is the message we have given to the public), but it does call for diversity. With diversity we lessen ignorance, and when we lessen the ignorance we lessen hate.

How do we change the mentality of our university? I have never seen this campus as a racist one, and still believe we are better than the n-word on a door. Our student population needs to start at the bottom, discussing with each other why these actions are wrong and educating our peers with diverse points of view. The few people which have committed this act need to know that it is an unacceptable one, and by voicing the opinion of the tolerant students which we know we can be, we may be able to put an end to the ignorance.

The administration, the faculty, and the students at Quinnipiac need change. We need diversity, we need to be exposed to cultures which we have never dreamed of learning, we need to learn about our own cultures, and we need to do everything we can to fight our own ignorance. Once was enough, and after the fourth attempt to strike fear into the minority community on campus, isn’t it time we stand up and fight?


About Kaitlyn Anness