Dress for success

By on October 10, 2007

The job interview is what college students work for. It is the handle that opens the door to the working world. As if obtaining an interview isn’t stressful enough, there is still more to consider.

While knowledge of the company is key, knowledge of oneself is even more important. Communication skills and the ability to speak well are an absolute necessity.

But after all is said and done, the interview is set up and the resume is ready to be paired with the face, one daunting question still remains: What is the appropriate attire?

Think of a typical Quinnipiac student’s closet. It is bursting with jeans and t-shirts, yet slacks and blazers are scarce. Fortunately, depending on where the interview is, suits and ties are not always necessary.

“I think business casual is appropriate,” said Professor Grace Levine, professor of communications and director of the school of communications’ internship program. “It has meaning for both young men and women.”

Business casual for women may be pants and a jacket or a skirt. For men, a pair of slacks and a shirt or sweater would suffice.

Levine did add, however, that ‘business casual’ may not be adequate in all fields. Interviewers on Wall Street or in law firms, may expect something a bit more formal.

“I wore a white button down shirt, black dress pants, and black heels to my first job interview,” said Jaclyn Pecchio, a junior accounting major who now works at an accounting firm in Hamden, Conn.

So what are students expected to do? The working world is competitive, and dressing appropriately while still managing to stand out as an individual has become more difficult.

While the term ‘business casual’ may conjure up images of dull pantsuits and graphically challenging ties, it does not have to. It can, in fact, have the opposite effect. Simple slacks and skirts leave room for fashionable accessories that can be used to reflect personality and style. Lanvin models walked the runway this season in jewel toned pumps. The footwear may seem loud initially, but when paired with more subtle business wear, brightly colored pumps or flats may suggest the perfect amount of individuality.

Not ready for neon patent leather? Sometimes a slight change can make a world of difference. This fall, Herm


About Gemma McFarland