The beginning of the end

By on September 26, 2007

In the words of Doctor Seuss, “You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own. And you know what you know. You are the guy who’ll decide where to go.”

Who can these words apply to? Seniors, of course.

To this year’s pack of freshmen, they look like adults. They live off campus in apartments and houses where they do their own cooking and cleaning. Some even have jobs lined up after graduation. The past three years have been life changing – the best years of their lives. Now it’s their last year, and it’s time to make it count.

“There is definitely an ‘I own this place mentality’ that my friends and I have discussed regarding senior year,” said senior media studies major Jared Zeidman, who lives on campus as a Resident Assistant.

Roaming the halls with three years of memories under their belts, Quinnipiac seniors are at the beginning of the end.

“Graduation will be the best and worst day of my life,” Zeidman said. “Quinnipiac University was the best thing that ever happened to me.”

“I’m jealous of the freshman because they still have four years here,” senior media production major Kim Denny said. “Being a senior is incredibly bittersweet.”

Because this year’s graduating class are only guaranteed three years of university housing, seniors are living all over. Denny, who lives in an apartment complex approximately 10 minutes away from the university, blocked all of her classes together so the commute would not be too time consuming. She is fortunate enough to have a car and an apartment not too far from campus.

And what about those who don’t drive at all?

Andrew Buckley, senior history major, lives approximately 15 minutes away from campus, depending on traffic, and doesn’t own a car.

“It’s a pretty big pain in the ass for me to get to campus,” he said.

Buckley built his schedule around those of his roommates who do have cars.

Other than the commute, seniors seem to have it all. With graduation only nine months away and the world at their fingertips, most spend their time enjoying their final year at Quinnipiac, hoping it will be as rewarding as the last three.

“You don’t need to fight for a parking spot in Hilltop, you get first pick of classes, and you’re older and more mature with the ability to experience more things and appreciate them,” Denny said.

Thoughts of freedom and less stress seemed to be on the mind of many seniors.

Four years ago, members of the Class of 2008 entered Quinnipiac University nervous about the four years ahead. Now they are older, anxious and apprehensive about their future and the “real world” that at one time seemed so far away.

“My first thoughts beginning senior year were that it was party time,” Buckley said. “But the realization that the real world is right around the corner is pretty intimidating.”

Whether they are from the past, from the present, or are yet to come, the memories of time spent at Quinnipiac University will remain a part of each and every senior. Zeidman, Denny, and Buckley all concur that the past 3 years have been irreplaceable, and have helped mold them into the comfortable adults that they are today.

“Graduation is the end of this chapter, and you never know what lies on the next page,” Zeidman said. “The only thing is, I really liked these past pages.


About Gemma McFarland