Letters to the Editor

By on February 14, 2007

Shame on You

John, Help your parents out with technology. If it’s too much for you to answer a few questions, shame on you. Are they sending you here for an education? Then use it wisely. “Everyone must work to live, but the purpose of life is to serve and to show compassion and the will to help others. Only then have we ourselves become human beings.” -Albert Schweitzer PH.D MD 1952 (Nobel Peace Prize Laureate).

-Submitted by Marisa P. Melillo
Proud to be of this generation

Two Words

This article is for oldies that are draining society. You know the fossils, the over-the-hill gang, those of us aged 40-65.

In particular, I defend the parents of college-age students. You know, those lousy creeps that did the feeding, clothing and sheltering. Let’s not forget to mention the countless trips to the doctor, the dentist, the social worker, the shrink, the sporting events and the birthday parties. And then there are the parking fines and the bail bonds.

Y’all better hope you never get the bill.

As far as us geezers being too lazy and stubborn to learn, take a look at reality. Many of the parents that foot the ever-staggering bill at Quinnipiac took a lesser road. A road filtered with, if they were lucky, night school, community colleges and four-year state schools.

Some of these past-their-primers even are blue collar workers: plumbers, nurses, construction workers, secretaries, garbage collectors and on and on. Imagine that.

Is there real harm, and is it such an imposition, when a parent asks their children for help technology-wise? If imitation is the highest form of flattery, being asked advice or help is a close second.

My stake in all this may be a bit different than most greybeards- I have a daughter that is a college senior, have graduated from Quinnipiac and now attend graduate school here. Hence, I’m older than all but a few of my professors. At times do I feel behind the curve of whippersnapper technology. Yes, but I get by. And you’re wrong implying that age has a bearing on the ability to learn.

Consider this novel idea. Maybe this lack of computer savvy by your parents can be turned into a positive. It could be your non-electronic connection to them. You remember the old bat and battleaxe that gave you life and financed your trip to Belize, and/or your new Jeep.

Mr. Radzinsky offered two words to us. Ancient ones: instruction manual. I offer him two back: respect and humility.

Better late than never.

-Submitted by John F. Gozzi
Quinnipiac Student


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