‘I Heart Art’ brings creative spirit to QU

By on December 6, 2006

Creativity, passion and pure talent filled the air at Montage’s second annual “I Heart Art” Festival on Thursday, Nov. 30 in Alumni Hall. Upon walking into the event, one couldn’t help but be completely captivated by the true beauty of the students’ work that surrounded the entire area. While gazing through the many different pieces of art, including paintings, digital design, drawings, photography and ceramics, it was hard to believe, yet at the same time completely awe-inspiring to know that these works were not just something you were looking at in any gallery. They were the works coming from the hearts and souls of fellow peers.

The “I Heart Art” Festival was filled with entertainment from the two bands that played, both including students at Quinnipiac, Thomas Keith and The Stone Quarries, a popular band on campus that frequently plays at Side Street Grille. Two other students, Fallon Mulerman and Amy Colosa, sang self-written songs, as well as a cover of “Don’t Speak” by No Doubt.

After Quinnipiac’s own students showed off their talent, the show was graced with more entertainment from three New York City slam poets.

As for the artistic talent at the festival, there was an array of artwork, including photographs by John-Austin Catero, a senior majoring in interactive digital design and entrepreneurship. He began taking photographs while on vacation with his family, and then, according to Catero, it became a hobby blown out of the water. His photographs include tropical beach scenes that give the impression of peering at the glistening turquoise water and hearing the waves crash onto the white sandy beach. Catero took these photographs on his travels through Peter Island in the British Virgin Islands, New Jersey and Oregon.

Mat DiGiovanna and Melissa Calabro, co-editors of the student literary magazine Montage, were the main organizers of this event.

A bold sign on one of the walls, sprayed in graffiti, read, “Where’s the Art?” When asked what this statement, and the festival, meant to him, DiGiovanna responded, “There is no art or diversity of any kind of culture here at Quinnipiac and we would like to showcase that here tonight so it gives the students of this university a chance to show their artwork and share their creative words.”

That goal was certainly achieved Thursday night. After this event, there will be more opportunities for students to share their work with others and for students to learn more about art by attending such events. After witnessing the large turnout of students and professors this event brought, there seems to be much hope.

The event was best summed up by Calabro.

“Every year (this event) is a very emotional time. There is no creativity outlet for students at Quinnipiac, and in doing this we are bringing a creative spirit to the University,” Calabro said. “It’s powerful to see what everyone can bring and give.”

If you are interested in submitting any of your artwork for possible publication in the Montage, please e-mail your work by attachment to Montage@Quinnipiac.edu by Friday, Dec. 8.


About Laura Manderino