No cash back for cramped rooms is unfair

By on September 5, 2006

It has come to my attention that Quinnipiac has received an anonymous donation of nearly 1.5 million dollars. The unknown benefactors have had their identities hidden from the public, until now.

The all too generous contributors are the residents of Larson, Troup, and Perlroth this year. By selflessly accepting ten people in suites that just one year ago were filled to capacity with eight students the almost 600 students in these buildings have done this campus a huge service.

In a coalition style effort, by bringing in these two extra beds and two extra full-priced room and board checks of nearly 12,000 dollars these altruistic students have donated almost 25,000 dollars per suite. With 57 suites in the three buildings which brings the grand total of this unbelievable contribution to 1,425,000 dollars.

You probably asking yourselves the same thing I did, what are these young people getting in return for their generosity? Some glamorous benefactors package maybe. No not for this group they do not get so much as in an inch more room in their tiny cramped suites. They did not demand extra internet jacks to improve the connection provided by the shoddy new bobcat net wireless network. Or even a single cent back on a room and board fee, which is more then last years students paid to live in eight person suites.

It is hard to believe that these students and their parents would just agree to donate such a large amount of money when they already pay over thirty thousand dollars a year to attend the school. But just add a twist of controversy to what seems to be a story about generosity these students and parents never agreed to make any kind of donation, they were forced.

The students living in Larson, Perlroth, and Troup given no choice in making this donation and in return, all these students have to give away twenty percent of the suites common living space. Furthermore to that the, students unlucky enough to fall even more victim to the inadequacies of the housing process here at Quinnipiac have been shoved into triples and will be living in even worse conditions.

The appalling abuse of power demonstrated here is unthinkable. For a school to charge current students the same money for rooming conditions that are clearly inferior to what they were a year ago is a perfect example of why the word greed tends to come up in many conversations about private universities.

Students and parents if you were spending 12,000 dollars on anything else you would fight for the best quality you could get for the money. Fight now; do not let your words fall on deaf ears. Let the administration know that he who deliberately makes a profit on the deterioration of your personal or your child’s quality of life does not do so with out consequences.


About Thomas Keith