Braff shows love’s true side in “The Last Kiss”

By on September 26, 2006

A romantic comedy/drama directed by Tony Goldwyn, “The Last Kiss” is a film not to be judged too quickly. With its fast-paced comedy and realistic emotional situations, this film defies the norm of the quintessential love story and instead tells it like it is.

Zach Braff, who plays Michael, a 29-year-old about to start a life and a family with his pregnant girlfriend, finds himself trapped in a life that has been all planned out for him.

Fearing his future and seeking change, he looks for answers in all the wrong places while trying to figure out if the life laid out for him is the one he wants. His friends look for their own answers while going through crises in their love lives.

The aftermath is merely the ups and downs of what couples and relationships truly go through.

Finally, here’s a film that acknowledges that love isn’t perfect, romance isn’t always obvious or poetic, and relationships take work. While the movie makes you think, it also makes you laugh with a well-written and humorously realistic screenplay. The editing also adds to the comedic effect of the film.

It could have had a typical happy ending, but instead it leaves you somewhat hanging. While it is slightly frustrating, it makes sense with the film and what it is trying to accomplish and works with the idea of realism within the story.

One aspect of the film that added to its success is the all-star cast. With one look, Zach Braff can relay to the audience his exact thought or emotion. His perfect timing has you laughing at even the most intense moments. You sympathize and relate to him, as you can with most of the characters and storylines in the movie.

Blythe Danner and Tom Wilkinson give an excellent portrayal as a married couple who have been together for 30 years. The strong point of the film is the inter relationships between these characters, each dealing with a different dilemma in their love life.

Don’t pass this one up because it looks like a chick flick. It will pleasantly surprise you as a film that both women and men can appreciate and enjoy.

Although it can be appreciated by an older audience, it’s really a film that is meant to be viewed by young adults. Not only does it depict relationships, love and heartache, it also illustrates the pressures and expectations of all young adults about to start a life in the real world.

I don’t think anyone will have a problem trying to relate to at least some aspect of this film. Although at times it gets a bit intense, from the beginning it is able to grab a hold of you and doesn’t let go until the end.

If you’ve ever been uncertain about your future, been pressured into growing up too fast or had problems in your relationships, this is a film for you.


About Megan Vanderhoef