Is PDA okay?

By on February 8, 2006

You’ve just finished class and go to check your mailbox, hoping for a package from mom and dad. Instead, you find two of your classmates in front of the post office, holding hands and gazing into one another’s eyes.

So, you proceed to the cafeteria where you wait in line behind a newly hooked-up freshman couple, kissing, giggling and trying to hide the purplish “bruise” marks on their necks.

Finally, you sit down with your cup of soup, hoping to finally unwind, when you find yourself parked directly across from your sophomore year roommate who is whispering sweet nothings into the ear of someone who you thought was her ex-boyfriend.

So what’s the problem?

Well, according to many students here at Quinnipiac, PDA, or public displays of affection, is a huge issue. And these acts are everywhere: in lines at the Bobcat Den, in the halls of Echlin, and of course, at Toad’s Place. But isn’t that to be expected?

So how much is too much? What’s appropriate and what’s borderline uncomfortable?

According to Courtney Rice, a junior Public Relations major, “things like hardcore make out sessions, baby talk, cuddling in front of lots of people, or constant use of pet names are things that are not appropriate in public.”

“These things should be kept either to a minimum or in the bedroom,” she said. “PDA makes some people uncomfortable and makes some people want to gag. It can almost be seen as disrespectful when couples constantly engage in PDA.”

Jesse Daunno, a senior Marketing major, said that “little kisses in public are alright, but more than that is overkill.”

Caitlin Litevich, a junior Marketing major, agreed with Daunno.

“PDA is disgusting,” she said. “It’s one thing to hold hands or give what I like to call a ‘grandma kiss,’ but it completely grosses me out when I see a couple making out. Now that’s just wrong.”

It seems that many QU students are eager to sound off on the PDA issue, and many appear to be against any extreme displays of affection at all.

“I think it’s ok to hold hands and give pecks of kisses here and there,” said freshman Interactive Digital Design major, Tiffany Onorato. “But when I see people making out hardcore I can’t help but wonder, aren’t they embarrassed?”

John Tramontana, a junior Physical Therapy major, said that PDAs can be “stand offish” and that “some things are prohibited by the law for a reason!”

Ariane Nievera, a senior Physician’s Assistant student disagreed.

“PDAs are OK as long as it’s limited to a hug or a little kiss on the cheek or lips,” she said. “But groping each other in public is very inappropriate.”

Marissa Criscitelli, a junior Marketing major, finds it hard to stomach dinner when a PDA pops up in the Caf


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