Sleeping Giant is adventurer’s delight

By on October 5, 2005

The park offers some 30 miles of hiking trails, all of different length and difficulty.

Skilled hikers can venture up the rocky terrain of the blue trail at the south end of the park to get a view of beautiful scenery, including the
Quinnipiac University campus and the north peak of the Giant.

For those who prefer not to break a sweat, the tower path is more pleasurable. It is a 1.6-mile steady hike that ends on the “left hip” of the
giant. Nearby stands a four-story tower resembling a medieval building, a popular spot to enjoy lunch and take pictures.

But Sleeping Giant State Park is not just for hikers. Fishermen frequently visit the park and can be seen angling for trout in the Mill River. The
park also features self-guided nature trail and several horse-back
riding trails.

Here is one bit of Sleeping Giant trivia — according to, a traprock company leased some of the land for quarrying in 1911. The
crushed rocks from the ridge were shipped across the state and used for building Connecticut roads and railroad trolley tracks. The quarry is no longer active, but some interesting ruins remain at the south end of the park.

Sleeping Giant is perfect for a summer day trip alone or with friends and family. The atmosphere provides endless possibilities of fun for people
of varying ages and abilities. Activities in the park include hiking, picnicking, and fishing.

The trails are manicured and well-maintained by volunteers from the Sleeping Giant Park Association. The group also sponsors more than 15
guided hikes a year.

Unfortunately, there are no trash cans on the mountain, only in the parking lot. So visitors carrying a water bottle or food, should be prepared to hold on to garbage for the long haul.

Parking is free on weekdays and $10 on weekends.
For more information about Sleeping Giant State Park visit

This article first appeared on and is republished with permission of The Hartford Courant.


About Maggie Wright