New shuttle system

By on October 5, 2005

In response to the ongoing problems concerning the university shuttles, security has instigated a number system to increase order and fairness.

“The suggestion for such a system actually came from students,” said John Twining, chief of security.

The system applies to the weekend shuttles that provide transportation to and from New Haven.

“We’re actually doing it for the ride home [from New Haven]. That’s where the trouble is,” said Patricia Hurlie-Smith, the security officer in charge of the students, system, and shuttles.

The new method begins when students reach the shuttle stop, where they are given a numbered ticket. For safety reasons, as well as comfort, the maximum number of students on the average-size shuttle is 40; 52 for the large shuttles. Tickets are handed out in groups of 40, so a student receiving number 21 will be on the first shuttle, a student with the number 50 will be on the second shuttle, and so on.

“There are three or four groups of 40, so roughly 160 tickets are given out each night,” said Twining. “The students give their ticket back before they board the bus. It’s a first come first serve basis.”

Sophomore Ali Marsh feels this is a fair tactic.

“People just walk up and get on without waiting, while some of us have been out [here] for a long time,” she said.

Along with fairness, safety for students is another objective for security. At the peak hours for going into the city, and returning home, masses of students can assemble at the shuttle stop, and depending on the time and weather, pushing and shoving fights can be started to get a foot through the bus door.

Most are pleased with the two-week old system thus far.

“It’s really good,” said shuttle driver Victoria Demetrias. “There used to be lots of pushing and shoving without the numbers. Now it’s more orderly.”

The system is not without its critics though.

“I feel like it really hasn’t made a difference since there are more and more shuttles available that there isn’t an issue of overcrowding on the buses,” junior Dean LoGiudice said.

Bosnack, in contrast, said he did not receive a number the first week due to the enormous amount of students vying for a ride downtown.

In response to the concerns of not having enough room on shuttles for students, Hurlie-Smith remains confident.

“We never leave a student behind.”


About Meredith Somers