Students too close for comfort in Ledges

By on September 14, 2005

Imagine your first day at college: You packed up the family car, fully prepared to consolidate your life to a small room. But when you arrive, you are not greeted by two or even three roommates. Instead, there are seven unfamiliar faces in the room. That is how college life began for the students placed in the Ledges’ study lounges.

A room that used to be fully equipped to provide a quiet haven for students has been turned into just another bunked room with posters on the walls and clothes on the floors. However, Ledges is not completely without study lounges. There are smaller lounges on every floor by the elevators and two TV lounges by the first and second floor entrances.

Turning the middle study lounges into a living area is not new by any means. What is new is the number of people placed in the rooms, which has increased from six to eight. Those currently living in the lounges assure that it is a great place to live.

“We all came in thinking it would be bad because it’s eight girls in one room, but we haven’t had any difficulties,” said Laurey Williamson, a freshman biology major.

“We moved the furniture for six hours, but we love it! We don’t want to be moved,” said Andrea Celetti, a freshman undecided liberal arts student.

It is no secret that Quinnipiac has trouble housing its students. Forced triples are in abundance and more students are choosing to live off campus prematurely.

Some may say the school should become more selective in admitting students, but that still does not change the current circumstances.

RAs have been very cooperative to the influx of students in their halls.

“This has affected two RAs in the Ledges and they are doing a great job of taking on eight extra residents,” said Felicity Melillo, Ledges residence hall director. The RAs have been utilizing the courtyards for hall meetings in order to accommodate the number of residents.

Even if the school cannot return the study lounges back to their original purpose, those inhabiting them are not complaining. Sara Giangiobbe, a freshman Psychology major, said, “It’s just like a big slumber party every night.”


About Renee Traynor