‘Vagina’ raises money to fight abuse of women, support freedom

By on February 23, 2005

“What would your vagina say if it could talk?” This question and many more were answered on Feb. 18 as Quinnipiac presented “The Vagina Monologues.”

The show, sponsored by GLASS [Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Supporters], hopes to promote awareness of abused women suffered worldwide. The idea is to make women more comfortable with who they are by seeing that other women have been vulnerable at some point or another.

Kristin Martin, a senior occupational therapy major, directed the play for the second year in a row. Friends first pressured Martin into doing the show three years ago, but she kept coming back for more.

“I liked the show and I liked the cause,” Martin said. “It’s fun to see [the performance] change every year even though it’s the same show.”

As if directing a show was not time consuming enough, Martin also has to worry about her busy OT schedule and working two jobs. However, she said it was worth her time because the girls were so passionate about the show and gave it their all.

Stephanie Fallar, a sophomore double major in political science and legal studies, is one of the girls performing the monologues. She enjoys telling the incredible stories and allowing herself to see other women’s stories through different interpretations.

“It takes a lot of guts to go up and do a monologue,” Fallar said.

Ninety percent of the show’s proceeds are going to the Domestic Violence Services of Greater New Haven. The agency’s mission is to provide individual safety and to break the cycle of domestic violence.

The other ten percent of the proceeds go to the Organization of Women’s Freedom in Iraq. The OWFI is most successful for its human rights campaigns in Iraq and creating the country’s first women’s shelter.

The author of “The Vagina Monologues” is Eve Ensler. Ensler based the work on real interviews conducted regarding women’s battles with domestic abuse, rape, incest and genital mutilation. Ensler won an OBIE award for her writing in 1997. The show is performed in cities and colleges all over the world and it has been translated in over 24 different languages.

Some monologues detailed the terrible ways in which women have been and are still being treated all over the world. However, several parts of the show were meant to be light-hearted and fun.

Sophomore nursing major Jennifer Bowen let out a number of laughs and even a few snorts.

“It’s funny because it’s true,” Bowen said. “Even if you don’t get all of it, there’s at least one part of the show that applies to you.”

John Mancini came to watch his daughter Antonia perform. Clearly he was not used to seeing his daughter in such a unique show, but enjoyed it immensely.

“The Vagina Monologues” will also be performed on Feb. 26 at 8 p.m. and Feb. 27 at 1 p.m. in Buckman Theater. For more information about the cause, visit www.vday.org.


About Renee Traynor