2003 Campus Security Report released

By on November 17, 2004

Quinnipiac University is a safe place to go to school, according to the latest campus security report released last week to members of the Quinnipiac community.

The numbers, which reflect the state of security on Quinnipiac’s campus for the 2003 calendar year, report that in the majority of categories, crime is down, or even non-existent.

However, there are two categories where there a spike is apparent.

In dormitories or other residential facilities, disciplinary referrals for liquor law violations are up quite substantially for calendar year 2003.

In 2003, there were 417 disciplinary referrals for liquor law violations, up from 292 referrals for 2002.

Chief of Quinnipiac Security John Twining explains the numbers as a result of students falsely believing there was no longer an alcohol policy in 2002.

He explained that when students returned to campus, a false rumor had circulated regarding the end of an alcohol policy, when in fact, there was just a shift.

According to the campus security report, “Quinnipiac University encourages mature reflection by its students when making personal choices.”

According to the student handbook, “Students are expected to act in a manner which neither abuses nor endangers themselves or others and refrain from behavior which is disorderly or destructive in nature.”

Chief Twining said because many students were unaware of the alcohol policy on campus, more referrals than normal were issued for alcohol-related offenses.

However, Twining did note that number of referrals were still down from the 669 that were issued in calendar year 2001.

Another number up sharply in 2003 was the number of disciplinary referrals for drug-related violations.

In 2003, there were 226 referrals issued in dormitories and other residential facilities.

The 226 referrals is up dramatically from the 175 issued in 2002 and 51 issued in 2001.

Chief Twining said considering the size of the campus, the 226 referrals is not that substantial.

There are currently no plans for security to change security procedures. However, Twining said that if such a change is needed, it will be done to protect the students and campus.


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