New Avalon acceptance policy upsets students

By on October 13, 2004

Current Avalon residents feel that the decision to stop accepting student applications was over the top and is a big mistake on the complex’s behalf.

Avalon distributed notices to all residents stating they would no longer be accepting undergraduate student applications for apartments.

“They are going to lose business and I think that it doesn’t make any sense. Why would they not allow undergrads to live here when that is who predominantly lives there?” said resident Chris Welsh, senior criminal justice major.

“I don’t know how they are going to do it. When everyone’s lease runs out, what are they going to do? It’s going to be empty here for awhile,” said resident Chad Listner, senior marketing major.

“I think it’s kind of ridiculous considering all of the students here now,” Listner said. “I see where they are coming from with all the problems with parking and trash and things. I think they should separate it, west for students and east for families.”

Avalon resident Jaime Swanson, senior public relations major, said, “I think it is a mistake for them because they are going to lose a lot of money. Thirty to 40 percent of residents are Quinnipiac students.”

Some student residents feel that Avalon should have warned students about the problems, and punished those causing them.

The action to stop allowing students to live in Avalon is “to the extreme, I don’t think Avalon should have gone that far,” Welsh said. “A general warning, or a notice saying people have to straighten up, and not jump to everyone getting kicked out would have been better.”

“I think that there are certain individuals who are irresponsible,” Swanson said. “Avalon has to pay up to $15,000 to fix some apartments, but most students are responsible enough not to ruin them.”

“I’ve been to my apartment when other girls lived there and it was a mess. They obviously didn’t take care of it. There were stains on the rug, the dishwasher was dented, and ping pong balls stuck under the stove,” Swanson said. “I think that is it the students that are paying half the rent or paying utilities that are being responsible.”

“Complaints were made about people who had parties, and going in and out and playing loud music,” Welsh said. “It is still not enough reason (to not let students live there.)

If Avalon was not an option, students would have looked at other apartment complexes in Hamden, or looked into renting a house.

“We might have looked into renting a house,” Swanson said. “We figured we’d live in Avalon to be with students.”

“I would probably get another apartment somewhere else in town,” said Welsh. “I wouldn’t want to live in a house. I’d look more into Applehill or Sera Monte. If there was a nice enough house and it was cheap then maybe.”

Residents who live at Avalon now are still concerned with the possibility of evicting current residents.

“I am scared of [being evicted],” Welsh said. “I’d say that this is going to make everyone think twice about being loud and doing stupid things because they aren’t tolerating anything anymore, they put their foot down.”

Avalon residents are not the only students who face the discrimination and unwelcoming feelings.

“College students aren’t wanted anywhere,” said Cassandra Pignatelli, senior marketing major, who lives in a house near campus.

“If our neighbors could kick us out, I feel like they would,” Pignatelli said. “Since college students have always lived in our house, I feel like they’d want to put it to an end. From day one they were rude to us, even though people are different.”

With Avalon not being an option, future students are going be put in a tough predicament on housing, an issue already problematic for Quinnipiac.


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