Studying abroad is very beneficial to QU students

By on April 15, 2004

Quinnipiac’s study abroad program director is urging students to register for the program , a program that is an alternative to traditional education here at Quinnipiac, before it is too late.

Patrick Frazier, director of study abroad programs, said students interested in the program need to figure out exactly when they want to study abroad and register as soon as possible.

According to Frazier, each major has a different semester that best suits their program.

“It’s important that students find out which semester is best for them to go in; certain semesters are much better for their major than others,” he said.

For example, Frazier said nursing students can not participate in the study abroad programs after their second semester of sophomore year.

“Because students don’t think about registering in their freshman year, he said, they’re caught because they have their field work junior and senior year.”

In order to comply with the Nursing program, nursing students have to complete their junior-senior professional component on campus.

Frazier said the journalism program has its own ideal time to go as well.

Study Abroad offers programs in over 15 countries including Argentina, Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, China, Costa Rica, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Spain, South Africa, and the UK.

If a student makes a request, other countries can be considered as well.

He said this adjustment was made to ensure that more students could participate in the program.

Full time students planning to study abroad are also required to receive prior approval from their respective department chairs.

Students need to present a copy of their passport, acceptance letter, visa copy if necessary and a flight itinerary.

The program is offered for spring, fall and summer sessions for a variety of courses. Students are advised to check the course listings to make sure that credits offered their schedules.

Tuition for the program is the same as regular tuition for those going to school full time and living in the Commons Residence Hall.

According to Frazier, Study Abroad tuition will only exceed that cost if the intended school room and board is higher than that of Quinnipiac’s.

“The price rarely is higher than tuition on campus, but if it happens, the difference will just be added to the bill,” Frazier said.

Frazier said in order to be successful in the foreign country they have chosen, students need to act as if they were still at home.

“As far as study habits go, students need to follow their work schedule here in the U.S and they will do fine,” Frazer said.

Frazier said students need to be aware of their habits while studying abroad.

“Students have enjoyed themselves a little more than they should have.”

He said students need to realize that just because they are out of the country, the same grading system still applies to them.

“Students need to realize that their grades do come back to them,” he said. “If they fail while studying abroad they just wasted away a semester that they now have to make up,” he said.

Anne Wrobel, sophomore, said studying abroad in England was a great experience.

“I love being abroad because I can view all different cultures from around the world,” Wrobel said.

“I love being able to step out of an environment that I’ve been adapted to live in for the past 20 years and step into something entirely different.”

Students interested in the program are asked to contact Frazier at the Office of International Education in FOB 106.

Frazier can be reached at x5215.

More information is available at the biweekly Study Abroad information sessions.


About Mindy Matteis