Sorority recruitment well underway

By on February 5, 2004

Sorority recruitment has begun.On Friday, Jan. 30, the kickoff to Greek recruitment began in Alumni Hall, with members of each sorority present hoping to attract new sisters.

Sorority membership begins during this recruitment period of about one week and lasts a lifetime.

Approximately 50 female students interested in becoming sisters of either one of Quinnipiac University’s sororities, Alpha Chi Omega and Phi Sigma Sigma, came out to learn about each sorority and meet the sisters.

All of the candidates go through the first two rounds of recruitment, which is best described as an introduction to Greek life and reinforces what the sisters and the sorority stand for.

After round two, the third and fourth rounds are invitation only, where each sorority, under its own rules, makes invitations to potential sisters and candidates get to know the sisterhood closer and get insight into each organization’s unique rituals.

The recruitment week concludes with the official acceptance of bids.

“The governing body of the sorority community is the Panhellenic Council. This group of women runs the recruitment process which is a process of mutual selection where the sorority and the member select each other,” Melissa Coons, junior communications major and outgoing President of the Panhellenic Council, said. “They are the unifying, governing and coordinating body of the sororities and members of the council are not allowed to reveal their sorority affiliation to the candidates during the recruitment process.”

Women who belong to Greek life believe it is an important to college life. Through this process, they say, one gains friends and a sense of life in general.

“A sorority is a well-rounded organization which offers its members not only social opportunities, sisterhood, and togetherness, but a community service aspect as well,” Coons said.

The members of the Panhellenic Council agree a sorority is a community in and of itself and believe in the anonymous quote, “From the outside looking in, you can never understand it; from the inside looking out, you can never explain it.”

The Panhellenic Council consists of two representatives from each sorority, four executive officers and an advisor and seeks to promote strength and unity between both sororities.

“Greek life is important because last year alone, the sororities on campus raised over $20,000 for community service-for organizations such as the National Kidney Foundation, the philanthropy of Phi Sigma Sigma and the Women of Domestic Violence, the philanthropy of Alpha Chi Omega,”Gina Carfi, a junior diagnostic imaging major and incoming President of the Panhellenic Counci said.

For most sisters, the choice to go Greek while here at Quinnipiac is not only for their benefit in college but for life thereafter.

“Greek life not only helps you while you are in college, with the sisterhood and togetherness but in life after college. Being a member of a national organization can help you in the real world,” Brenna Hillegas, junior advertising major and outgoing vice president of the Panhellenic Council, said. “I was extremely active in high school and knew that I wanted to do the same here at Quinnipiac, to make a rewarding college career. I wanted to be active though on different levels, which a Greek organization gives me all in one-leadership opportunities, social involvement, and community service.”

Scott Hazan, assistant director of the Carl Hansen Student Center and Student Leadership Development and Greek Advisor, is very excited about helping out the Greek life on campus. He feels students have a lot to gain through the process.

“Greek life at Quinnipiac University is founded upon the principles of friendship, philanthropy, scholarship and leadership,” Hazan said. “It offers you an opportunity to grow as an individual, gain lifetime friends, and contribute to your campus and community.”

Hazan went on to say it will help students in the years to come.

“It can be truly one of the most enriching and rewarding parts of the college experience that doesn’t end after four years. It’s a commitment that will benefit you now and in the future,” Hazan said.


About Amy Trapini