Film production program in France available

By on February 26, 2004

Quinnipiac University is ready to begin its fourth summer in France.

Professor Raymond Foery, Chair of Media Production, is looking for 12 mature and responsible students who want an intense 3 weeks in Nice, France to develop, write and shoot their own films.

Students work Monday through Friday from about 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. The first week of the trip, students will analyze films at the Ecole Superiuer De Realisation Audiovisculle in a class taught in English by Foery.

They will also start to plan their scripts. The students work on their films in groups of four. Foery says the students will also be introduced to the French language and culture.

In the beginning half of the second week, students will complete their screenplays. Then they will begin to shoot. In the third week, students edit their films.

Both technical staff and Foery try to help the students with any questions they might have. The final test of their project comes when they show their work to French film and television professionals. The professionals evaluate the films and give the students feedback. Foery says all the students’ time and effort does not go unnoticed.

“We have an end of the term celebration for the students’ hard work,” Foery said. When the students return for the fall semester, there is a debriefing. During Parent’s Weekend, students show their films so that parents may see their work.

Foery says the students will also be able to do more than just make their movies. They have the weekends off.

“First weekend is for travel. Second weekend, they are shooting. Third is a shopping day, then home,” Foery said.

The course is going to be held June 5-27(Dates may change by one week).

For $5460, students get round trip airfare from New York to Nice, transportation to and from the airport, breakfast and lunch on weekdays, housing in a hotel, and 4 credits that can count as a production elective.

Foery hopes that students enjoy the experience of the trip.

“Students do not have much exposure to foreign language or countries. In a post 9/11 world, it is good to have that exposure. It is a complicated world,” Foery said.

He also hopes the students understand the importance of what they are doing.

“The students are working intensely in one subject. They are doing it for a jury. It is a pre-professional experience,” he said.

In the past three years, 36 students have participated in the program. Foery has gotten nothing but positive feedback.

“Everyone has said it was their single best experience at QU.”

Students who are interested in joining the program or who want to receive more information should contact:


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