Freshman class raises Quinnipiac standards

By on October 2, 2003

This year’s freshman class at Quinnipiac University scored higher on their SATs on average than last year’s class, according to Dean of Admissions Joan Isaac Mohr.

According to Mohr, the freshman class is 61 percent female, compared to only 39 percent male. This stat follows a national trend of higher enrollment of female students.

Nationally, 55 percent of all college acceptances are women. According to Mohr, the School of Health Sciences is a major factor in why there are more females here at Quinnipiac than there are males.

“The School of Health Sciences makes up 30 percent of the class, and there are 81% female in this particular school alone,” she said.

The class is also made up of students from 24 different states around the country.

Topping the list of states is New York, where exactly one-fourth of the class hails from. Following New York is Connecticut with 23 percent, New Jersey with 21 percent, and Massachusetts with 17 percent. The majority of the remaining enrolled students are mostly from the New England area.

Students in this year’s freshman class raised the average SAT score to 1097, which is a 21-point increase from last year’s scores.

According to Mohr, however, SAT scores are not as big a determinant in the admissions process as many think.

“We look at their primary high school transcripts and all that it shows,” she said.

“We look at their courses, their levels within these courses, their grades, their grade patterns, and then, of course, their SATs. We then consider everything else that the student participates in, such as clubs and extra-curricular [activities].”

Students accepted into the class ranked in the top 29 percent of their high school classes on average. They also earned an average GPA of 3.3.

These statistics support the growing belief Quinnipiac is becoming a much more selective school. Since becoming a University, the school has seen the amount of applicants steadily increase, while also watching the number of admitted students rise slightly.


About Kristin Kroha