A night of mischief

By on October 30, 2003

Fall is here and with it comes not only cold weather, but a holiday students celebrate for two days.

Halloween is almost here, but before you can go out trick or treating or to a costume party on campus you have to survive one special night, Mischief Night.

During the Irish potato famine of 1845, many people immigrated to the Unites States and with them came traditions and folklore. One of the things the Irish and the Scots brought over was the tradition of Mischief Night.

On this night, people would go around playing tricks on each other such as unhinging gates and letting cows loose, turning over outhouses and throwing manure into the streets.

While the “tricks” have evolved in modern times, the tradition of causing mischief the day before Halloween still lives on.

By today’s standards, the tricks of the past might seem lame. Now adays, teenagers have come up with many inventive ways of wreaking havoc on their neighbors.

“In high school we would go around and completely cover people’s cars with tape so that in the morning when they went to go to work they couldn’t open their car doors, and it would be impossible to figure out where the tape stopped,” said Carla Pasquale, sophomore undecided major.

“Or even though it was really corny, we would light bags of dog droppings on fire on someone’s doorstep,” Pasquale said. “It was funny to watch them stomp it out.”

Toilet papering the neighborhood or egging houses is fun to some, but for others on the receiving end of a Mischief Night, pranks are not too much fun.

Melissa Concepcion, sophomore mass communications major recalls a memorable first Mischief Night at Quinnipiac.

“Last year really late at night there was a knock on our door. When we opened it all we saw was a sea of rotten milk coming into our dorm room. Someone had propped an open container of spoiled milk onto our door and then knocked and ran. It was so gross! There was rotten milk everywhere.”

Students have already started to plan for this year’s festivities. “I am not 100% sure what I am going to do yet this year,” said junior Jay Martin, undecided major. “But I know it will involve shaving cream.”

Others are moving on from their childhood prankster days.

“Now that I am almost 20 I think I am too old to go around throwing toilet paper everywhere,” said sophomore Allie Finegan business major. “Once you pass18, you just got to let Mischief Night go, especially since you could probably get in a lot more trouble when you’re older.”


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