Hyde’s advice for SGA

By on April 24, 2003

Many students were disappointed by the lack of efficiency in the recent housing lottery. In the past two years, Quinnipiac has revoked senior housing privileges and the right of freshmen students to bring their cars to campus. The student center is overcrowded, the student handbook limits student rights in the judicial process and tuition is increasing exponentially.

Even the clock tower still runs five minutes later than the rest of the campus. The point? Even though our university is generally run better than most, we still have prevalent student concerns that need to be addressed.

At present, the only body that has the power to make the changes wanted and needed by the students is the Student Government Association (SGA). After an election marked by tough campaigns and lofty goals and promises, it is time to put pressure on our leaders to act professionally and responsibly in resolving these issues.

In the last issue of the Chronicle, Yearbook Editor Lauren O’Leary wrote an articulate and bold editorial about the utility of the Student Government at Quinnipiac. The topic has been one addressed exhaustively throughout the year by many students, myself included.

However, many of the requests made by my journalist colleagues and I have been flagrantly ignored, and neither the topic of media relations or the role of Student Government has ever been openly addressed by the leadership of SGA.

Although, as Lauren says, the members are generally exceptional people, the organization lacks the focus and order needed to be truly successful.

Instead of focusing on the negative aspects of Student Government, I’d like to counter each point with a practical solution.

With the new executive board officially transitioned into power, these words may serve as something of a guide towards reconciling some of the distinct inadequacies that threaten to continually degrade SGA’s reputation.

First, the fundamental objective for President Melissa Dudra needs to be to master basic skills in parliamentary procedure.

For those of you who are unaware, there is a specific set of guidelines to follow that help with meeting efficiency and decorum. However, after a year in office, our president still routinely confuses basic rules of order, and the meetings end up losing focus.

Although her days are long and stressful, and she deserves an enormous amount of credit for representing herself on our behalf, my personal affinity for the president does not inhibit me from making constructive criticism.


About Tom Hyde