Recognition sought for cager Bishop

By on November 7, 2002

Sometimes, in collegiate sports, it’s not about how well you play the game, but how well you and your university are known.
An excellent example is Jeremy Bishop of our Quinnipiac University Bobcats men’s basketball team. Bishop had what could be considered by many NCAA Basketball experts to be an All-American season last campaign.
A vicious rebounder, Bishop ranked first, yes that says first, in the nation in rebounds per game with 12.0 per contest. One of just 20 players at the Division I level who was averaging a double-double last year, Bishop grabbed double digit rebounds in 22 of 30 games in the 2001-2002 season.
Bishop also shot an impressive .479 (127-for-265) from the field, and was solid at the free throw line (.693, 61-for-88).
While securing All-American level rebounding statistics, Bishop also averaged 11.0 points per game for Quinnipiac University, but received not one All-American vote. It would be hard to argue against the fact that Bishop played to, at the very least, an Honorable Mention All-American level.
As a senior, Bishop will strive to outdo his 2001-2002 accomplishments. Student-led well-directed and persistent game by game publicity could highlight the fact that our university has an All-American quality player, and Bishop’s name could benefit the team and the university.
Bishop deserves to be the subject of regional and national newspaper articles, ESPN highlight films and ultimately, NCAA division one basketball All-American selection ballots.
An All-American athlete can have a spectacular impact on a university, and has a tremendously beneficial affect on students, alumni and boosters.
Boston College was a football backwater before Doug Flutie. Georgetown University was a regional secret before Patrick Ewing. Closer to home and contemporary, the All-Americans at UConn have paid huge dividends in quality enrollment in recent years, moving UConn out of previous absolute national obscurity.
If our university aspires to the highest level of collegiate competition, it is the responsibility of the president, board of directors and the athletic department to support and foster national attention for the Quinnipiac University athletes that perform at the highest level.
Anything less than a full-blown, organized, concerted effort on the part of the university will leave Jeremy Bishop and Quinnipiac University once again unmentioned and uncelebrated on the list of NCAA division I basketball elites.


About Wesley Barrett - Guest Writer