Education lacking in politics

By on October 17, 2002

The two-party system in American politics has controlled the United States since the formation of the presidency. Most recently, Republicans and Democrats have blurred the party system, leaving many Americans unable to distinguish the difference between these two political parties.
Voters today are registering in large numbers as independent, unaffiliated or as members of a third party. The main reason behind this new wave of thought is that voters and non-voting citizens are completely turned off by the nasty, political wars occurring today. Everything in politics is about campaigning, fundraising or motivating others to participate.
Rarely does anyone speak of education of the political process. What is the difference between the political affiliations, whether a Democrat, Independent, Republican, Third Party or Unaffiliated?
Basic rhetoric by a reporter on what he or she believes the political system is about does no justice to the American people, who deserve to hear the truth from those who make the news.
Don Greenberg, a member of Democrats for Change, a group based out of Bridgeport, Conn., explained what he believes the Democratic Party stands for.
“The Democratic Party stands for working to use the resources of government, to help alleviate the social problems created by a so-called free market economy, minimum wage, pensions, aid to education, regulation on the excesses of business.”
If you are interested in finding out more about the Democratic Party in Connecticut, feel free to visit their web site at
“The Green Party stands for a more democratic society and opposes the corporate takeover of our public resources,” said David Bedell, a member of the Fairfield Chapter of the Connecticut Green Party. “Our platform is based on values such as ecological wisdom, respect for diversity, nonviolence, and social and economic justice.”
If you would like to find out more information about the Green Party in Connecticut, visit their web site at
Being Independent today means you share the believes of Governor Jesse Ventura (I) of Minnesota and former presidential candidate Ross Perot. Connected by mistrust of politicians and parties, the need for reforming the political process and opposition to the corrupting influence of special interests in government and elections, many Independents want change to occur.
Many independents and unaffiliated voters are frustrated with the current state of politics: the Democratic and Republican Parties.
Connecticut Union of College Republicans Chairman Jason Swan goes into what the Republican Party stands for.
“Small government that is efficient and effective, free enterprise encouraging initiative and incentives giving individuals a chance to flourish are only part of the Republican Party,” he said. “Sound money policy along with national pride and the encouragement of equal rights, equal justice and equal opportunity are essential for true democracy to exist in the United States.”
To find more information about the Republican Party, visit the Connecticut Union of College Republicans at http://www.ct. or the Connecticut Republicans at
An unaffiliated voter really has no interest in joining a political party or doesn’t know enough about any one particular party to make a commitment. Instead of moving toward the Independent Party movement, these individuals chose to stay alone on their journey through the political landscape.


About Sean Hughes - Staff Writer