TV lounge escape for commuters

By on November 1, 2001

Being a commuter student at Quinnipiac has become the social norm, but how are these students being accommodated on campus? The biggest problem in recent years has been parking, and the lack of it, but with the opening of Hogan Lot to commuters this semester, much of the congestion has been resolved.
One asploect about commuting that some may say is a downfall is to not live that great “dorm life” that people talk about where you can be totally surrounded by people your age and continually meeting and making new friends.
However, to some students it is worth it not living in a dorm.
“I save 4,000 dollars and get my own room by living off campus” said junior Ryan Jones.
Because of the amount of money to be saved by living off campus, more and more students chose to do so. The question is, if all these students are commuting to school, where are they supposed to go in between classes?
Most people wouldn’t want to give up those valuable parking spaces they’ve been waiting so long in line to get, and going to the library each and every day can become depressing. So, where do these students go to put up their feet and relax if they don’t have a dorm room to lounge in?
The school has provided an answer. At the top of the stairs on the second floor of the Student Center there is a TV lounge available for commuters. Students who have no place to be between classes will find a big screen television set, couches, tables, a private room for telephone calls, and a fridge in here.
According to Jones, you will find commuter students in here usually watching Jeopardy.
“Whoever gets there first gets the remote and then passes it off as they leave,” he said.
The TV Lounge is also a place where students can go to eat lunch or meet with friends in between classes or just sit and watch television before their next class.
Across the hall is the Music Listening Lounge where students can go to listen to music while doing work. Neither room is ever overly crowded, according to Jones.
“But they are becoming more popular,” he said.


About Amber Caron - Staff Writer