The unyielding tide of liberty

By on September 20, 2001

Two Boeing 767’s changed the face of America on impact as kamikaze terrorists and the World Trade Center met head-on. Those who commandeered the aircrafts were able to penetrate security systems and were victorious in their attack. In the days following the catastrophe, there is a general feeling of helplessness among the public which will remain at least until American militia is motioned into action. Yet there are specific manners by which the terrorists will be given a larger conquest by our people, and it is our behavior and frame of mind in the turmult that will invite such a circumstance.
A widespread feeling of malaise and disbelief spans the nation, and deservedly so. The fact that the terrorists involved are faceless makes this situation more difficult for Americans to bear. A common reaction to this is to generalize and misdirect this hatred upon a certain people.
This transforms sentiments into blind hatred and intolerance, and an unconstructive “kill `em all” mentality that has surfaced especially regarding Islamic individuals. Senior Joey Gardner said, “They should die. Who’s got the bombs? We got the bombs.” This sort of outlook is the same kind that generated the attacks in the first place, and it is this kind of fanaticism that gave birth to the unspeakable concentration camps of the earlier twentieth century, an episode the world is still trying to forget.
The attacks on September 11 were absolutely deplorable, and as the Libertarian party’s press release says, “No legitimate political or religious ideology can justify the murder of thousands of innocent people.” While these attacks may have been state-supported, a terrorist act should not, though, they bring about the deaths of the innocent in their country. “An eye for an eye” has the probability to transform into “an eye for an eye for an eye,” concluding with a civilization in ruins. Simply put, retribution may well be revenged. A military response to attain justice is unquestionably necessary, provided that it is rational and not influenced by abhorrence.
The American public was mollified once it had someone to hold responsible, a face for hate, a scapegoat. This face was of the infamous Osama bin Laden, a known millionaire whose hatred of America is now akin to the American hatred of him. While disgust for this evil individual is completely warranted, it is vital that the public sustains levelheadedness throughout the aftermath.
America will be in many ways altered after such a dreadful incident, as sophomore Sharon Healey remarked, “I know it is a clich


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